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Tuesday, August 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Acquisition of spatial representations for large environments found in the catalog.

Acquisition of spatial representations for large environments

Peter M Crane

Acquisition of spatial representations for large environments

by Peter M Crane

  • 239 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Miami University in Oxford, Ohio .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Geographical perception

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Peter M. Crane
    The Physical Object
    Pagination71 leaves, typed :
    Number of Pages71
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14533706M

    The influence of affective associations on the development of cognitive maps of large environments / J.F. Herman, B.S. Miller and J.H. Shiraki Spatial representations, a wayfinding perspective / R. Passini Sketch-map variables as predictors of way-finding performance / M.J. Rovine and G.D. Weisman. Suggested Citation: "4 Teaching and Learning About Spatial Thinking." National Research Council. Learning to Think Spatially. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / Spatial thinking is powerful and pervasive, underpinning everyday life, work, and science (Chapter 3). It plays a role in activities ranging from.

      This research investigated developmental changes in children’s representations of large-scale environments as reflected in spontaneous gestures and speech produced during route descriptions Four-, five-, and six-year-olds (N = ) described the route from their nursery school to their own homes. Analysis of the children’s gestures showed that some 5- and 6-year-olds . Moore (1 ) survey this large body of literature and propose a modified version of the Piaget and Inhelder model. Siege1 and White () concentrate their review on large-scale space, and show a strong parallel between achild's acquisi- tion of spatial competence and an adult's acquisition of the spatial structure of aCited by:

    Four experiments investigated the role of reference frames during the acquisition and development of spatial knowledge, when learning occurs incrementally across views. In two experiments, participants learned overlapping spatial layouts. Layout 1 was first studied in isolation, and Layout 2 was later studied in the presence of Layout by: Abstract Cognitive maps are the representations that individuals use to understand, process, and navigate environments. The term cognitive map should not be taken as a literal metaphor as the internal representation will often violate principles of two-dimensional geometry, will rarely be either continuous or complete, and will often include non-spatial attributes, such as sights, .


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Acquisition of spatial representations for large environments by Peter M Crane Download PDF EPUB FB2

Learning-Dependent Evolution of Spatial Representations in Large-Scale Virtual Environments Article in Journal of Experimental Psychology Learning Memory and Cognition 45(3).

Spatial cognition involves the attainment, use, and adjustment of knowledge about spatial relationships and environments. The development of spatial cognition abilities is essential for a variety of skills essential for daily functioning (e.g., finding one's way around) and for higher-order processes (e.g., advanced mathematics).

The Development of Spatial Representations of Large-Scale Environments. Author links open overlay panel Alexander W. Siegel Sheldon H. White. Show more. The development of the sequence of spatial representations in children conforms to the “main sequence” identified in the construction of spatial representation in by: The issue that guides the present research programme concerns the representation of large-scale environments, environments that are too large to be perceived from a single vantage point.

In particular, this paper is concerned with the effects of experience on the representation of a large urban environment, and how experience is manipulated by Cited by:   Theoretical models suggested several ways to bridge the gap between spatial representations for 1-m boxes used in laboratory experiments, Cited by: Spatial dimensions (2D vs.

3D), spatial scales (vista-scale vs. large-scale environments) and the abundance of visual landmarks critically affect navigation performance and behavior in healthy. A theory about the acquisition and use of cognitive maps of largescale everyday environments is presented.

The basic assumptions of the theory are (1) people's behavior in social and physical environments is determined by action plans, and, if the execution of such action plans requires traveling, plans for how to travel, termed travel plans, are formed and Cited by:   Siegel AW, White SH () The development of spatial representations of large-scale environments.

In: Reese HW (ed) Advances in child development and behavior, pp 9–55 Google Scholar Sinton DS, Kolvoord B, Gersmehl P, Bednarz S, Uttal D () The people’s guide to spatial : Alfonso García de la Vega.

A new framework for understanding the acquisition of spatial knowledge in large-scale environments in: Spatial and Temporal Reasoning in Geographic Information Systems M. Engenhofer and R. Golledge (Eds) pp. – Oxford University Press Cited by: 1.

Skår, Margrete and Krogh, Erling Changes in children's nature-based experiences near home: from spontaneous play to adult-controlled, planned and organised activities.

Children's Geographies, Vol. 7, Issue. 3, p. Cited by: In cognitive psychology and neuroscience, spatial memory is a form of memory responsible for the recording of information about one's environment and spatial orientation. For example, a person's spatial memory is required in order to navigate around a familiar city, just as a rat's spatial memory is needed to learn the location of food at the end of a maze.

Spatial cognition is concerned with the acquisition, organization, utilization, and revision of knowledge about spatial environments. These capabilities enable individuals to manage basic and high-level cognitive tasks in everyday life.

Numerous disciplines (such as Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence, Geographic Information Science, Cartography, etc.) work. Individual differences in the representations of novel environments.

Journal of Environmental Psychology, Vol. 25, Issue. 1, p. Spatial knowledge acquisition in a virtual environment (Doctoral dissertation, The development of spatial representations of large-scale spatial environments.

In H. Reese. Peter M Crane has written: 'Acquisition of spatial representations for large environments' -- subject(s): Geographical perception Asked in Authors. the acquisition of cultural tools. In particular, the mastery of symbolic spatial representations, such as maps and models, significantly augments basic spatial capabilities.

While growing evidence implicates both biological and experiential factors in the development of spatial cognition, a deeper understanding of. to distinct spatial representations conveying different types of information. Research focused on the characteristics of distinct spatial representations and the process implied in the acquisition of spatial knowledge in new environments.

Siegel and White () proposed a theoretical framework for describing and explaining the. Current trends in geography's techniques suggest a future in which researchers, students, business people, and public policy makers will explore a world of shared spatial data from their desktops.

They will request analyses from a rich menu of options, select the geographic area and spatial scale of analysis, and display their results in.

This article reports on an experiment undertaken to test the spatiocognitive competence of the visually impaired population in regard to wayfinding. The test consisted of eight basic wayfinding tasks, each representing a particular spatio-cognitive by: This book is a gathering of original research contributions focusing on recent developments in spatial analysis and modelling with implications to—spatial—planning.

The book is organized in three parts that make use of spatial analytic approaches in Author: José António Tenedório, Jorge Rocha. Application of environmental learning theory to spatial knowledge acquisition from maps. Annals, Association of American Geographers, 82(2): Mark, D.

M., Spatial Metaphors for Human-Computer Interaction. Proceedings, Fifth International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling, Charleston, South Carolina, Augustv.

1. An important question regards how we use environmental boundaries to anchor spatial representations during navigation.

Behavioral and neurophysiological models appear to provide conflicting predictions, and this question has been difficult to answer because of technical challenges with testing navigation in novel, large-scale, realistic spatial.Urban cognition.

[Tommy Gärling;] -- Consists of papers previously published in the Journal of environmental psychology. --The influence of affective associations on the development of cognitive maps of large environments / J.F.

Herman, B.S. Miller and J.H. Shiraki --Spatial representations.The acquisition and integration of route knowledge in an unfamiliar neighborhood. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 10, Google Scholar Cross Ref; Garling, T., Book, A., & Ergezen, N. (). Memory for the spatial layout of the everyday physical environment: Differential rates of acquisition of different types of by: 5.